Mindset, Uncategorized

Adapting to change

Dealing with changes in our lives and our situations determines if we survive or not, metaphorically and in reality.  Our brains are wired to deal with change.  Humans have developed the ability to look ahead and orient themselves to the events occurring, or about to occur, around them. Yet so many modern day people resist the urge to change;  they like to view the world in a static/unchanging perspective.

Why is this the case?  If you are comfortable and secure in your space then there’s nothing pushing you to move towards a change. I believe it is that simple.  I am guilty of falling into that trap as much as anyone. Early in my career I pushed myself to achieve specific goals.  As I attained a level of success in my life, that desire to push myself fell away.  That happened more than 10 years ago.  Recently, I started reevaluating where I am in virtually all aspects of my life.  The clear conclusion is that I have built myself a nice comfortable prison cell, created full of comfort and completely lacking in meaning!  Life is not about comfort, its about striving to be better and to help others be better people. In this way we can build better communities and a better culture for our children to inherit.

So, what I am doing to change. First it starts with a goal, then observe where necessary to achieve that goal. Orient my thoughts and identify possible actions to achieve it. Decide which of the possible actions will achieve my goal. Lastly, its to take that action based on those things. This approach of Observe, Orient, Decide and Act (OODA) is what modern day fighter pilots have been using for 50 years. It was developed by Col. John Boyd who was famous for being able to defeat any opponent in 40 seconds or less, among many other things.  He was dubbed “Forty Second Boyd” for his standing bet as an instructor pilot that beginning from a position of disadvantage, he could defeat any opposing pilot in air combat maneuvering in less than 40 seconds.  Col. Boyd developed this OODA loop methodology as way to defeat the enemy, but it turns out its equally relevant in just about every aspect of life.  The faster one iterates through the OODA loop the larger the advantage they gain against their opponent.

The goal of this post is really to point out that the enemy in our lives is the lack of challenges and change/growth.  Without the pursuit of goals there can be no growth, without growth there is no meaning. So I am breaking out of my self-made prison and going on an adventure.  I hope that those that read this will start their own adventure and maybe our paths will cross!